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Al Wusta

A’Dakhiliyah, meaning ‘The Interior’, is a land-locked governorate comprised of a portion of the Al Hajar Mountain range and eight separate districts: Adam, Al Hamra, Bahla, Bidbid, Izki, Manah, Nizwa and Samail.

Some of Oman’s greatest attractions are in this region, including the Sultanate’s highest mountain – Jebel Shams – and Jebel Al Akhdar, a mountainous plateau that is known for its green terrace fields brimming with roses, pomegranates and other fruit.

The Al Hoota Caves, a recently-restored vast cave system estimated to be over two million years old and rich with stalactites and stalagmites, and many ancient castles and forts which have also been beautifully restored and are now open to the public are also of interest, especially UNESCO World Heritage Sites the Bahla Fort and the renowned Nizwa Fort and Souq.

Things to Do and Places to See in Al Wusta

Interested in a particular type of holiday experience? there is so much to do in Oman that you will want to keep coming back. Here are just a few of the possibilities to help make your next visit to Oman perfect.

Village of Al Sayq

Although it was formerly one of the difficult places that has access problems in Oman, the village of Sayq is one of the agricultural wonders in the Sultanate of Oman, which contains orchards full of fruits, it also provides its visitors an interesting view of the nearby wadis, and is the perfect place for camping or accommodation in one of the fancy hotels.

Wadi Bani Habib

One of the famous wadis in Al Jebel Al Akhdar, this Wadi can be explored on foot. It is surrounded on all sides with green walnut groves and some local bushes widely scattered. It also the home to the abandoned village of Bani Habib, which welcomes visitors who are trekking and exploration lovers.

Geology 

Looking back on a geological history spanning across millions of years, Oman is one of the few places that carries its unique geological heritage on the open. Attractions such as Jebel Shams, or the Ophiolite rocks surrounding Muttrah Corniche, were once at the bottom of the ocean.

Wadi Ghul

Jebel Shams is most known for its beautiful view of the Wadi Ghul, that lays deep below it. The wadi is an attraction in its own right, leading through a number of traditional villages that can only be accessed by 4WD.

Mountains 

Mountains take up a large part of Oman’s landscape, varying greatly in appearance vegetation. Often times they feature stunning wadis, cut into the mountains through time and crossable only by 4×4.

Bidbid Castle

A quaint 16th century castle located on a turnoff from the Nizwa highway, Bidbid Castle has been beautifully restored and is set within a date palm oasis, with a winding falaj (waterway) running around it.
 
 

Al Jabal Al Akhdar

Terraced farms and cooler weather great adventurers atop the Al Jebel Al Akhdar range. Here, hiking routes are mainly along its beautiful villages, but also through wadis and terrace fields. Local tour operators are happy to assist with guided tours.
 
 
Wildlife Watching

If you have ever witnessed endangered Green Turtle babies hatch and try to make their way to the water, you will know what a special experience it is. Oman remains dedicated to enabling these kind of wildlife encounters while protecting the animals.

Al Hoota Cave
Nestled at the foothills of the Al Hajar Mountains, the two-million-year-old Al Hoota Cave has been opened to visitors. Guided tours are provided throughout the day along ramps that run alongside the stalactites and stalagmites that cover the expanse of these large caves. The caves also support an ecosystem comprising of several lakes and cave-dwelling wildlife.

Jabal Shams

Jebel Shams provides beautiful views of the surrounding landscape as well as Wadi Ghul – Oman’s very own Grand Canyon. Jebel Shams has a number of marked hiking routes, the most famous (and easiest!) being the Rim Walk to the abandoned village of As Sab, which was once home to about 15 families that built their homes into the side of the cliff.