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A'dhahriyah 

Once situated in prime position on the ancient trade routes, A’Dhahirah in Oman’s west is traditionally the bridge between Oman’s stunning mountain ranges and the neighbouring UAE and Saudi Arabia.

Archaeology and history play a major role in this region, which extends all the way from the Al Hajar Mountains to the Empty Quarter known as Rub Al Khali.

The city of Ibri can be reached within a few hours from Muscat, and is home to the impressive Ibri Fort, with its ancient mosque and many different gates. The small village of Bat, east of Ibri, is home to a remarkable array of beehive tombs from the Bronze Age, listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1988.

Things to Do and Places to See in A'dhahirah

Interested in a particular type of holiday experience? there is so much to do in Oman that you will want to keep coming back. Here are just a few of the possibilities to help make your next visit to Oman perfect.

Bayt Al Marah Castle 

Built by the Nabhani dynasty in the 17th century, this castle is a large mud-brick palace located in Yanqul, a remote village at the base of Jebel Al Hawra.

Al Iraqi Fort

North of Ibri, along the road connecting Ibri and Al Rustaq, are the twin settlements of Al Araqi and Al Aynayn. Their forts provide a beautiful contrast – one newly restored, the other beautifully atmospheric and showing all the signs of its history.

Al Ayn And Bat Beehive Tombs

A must-see attraction in the A’Dhahirah region, the Al Ayn and Bat Beehive Tombs are not only recognised as a UNESCO World Heritage site, but also boast the title of the most complete collection of necropolises and settlements in the world, dating back to the 3rd Millennium BC.

Mountains 

Mountains take up a large part of Oman’s landscape, varying greatly in appearance vegetation. Often times they feature stunning wadis, cut into the mountains through time and crossable only by 4×4.

Geology 

Looking back on a geological history spanning across millions of years, Oman is one of the few places that carries its unique geological heritage on the open. Attractions such as Jebel Shams, or the Ophiolite rocks surrounding Muttrah Corniche, were once at the bottom of the ocean.

Valley’s

Some have stunning water pools, fed by natural springs, and a backdrop of rugged mountains. Others are framed by date and fruit plantations that to this day are tended by locals using traditional falaj or waterways.

Ibri Castle 

Ibri Fort was built over 400 years ago and opened for public viewing in 1995 after extensive renovations. It is home to one of the oldest mosques still in use in the country and visitors can take in stunning views across the area from the building’s battlements. One of the fort’s more unique features are the many gates which were each built for a different purpose.
Wildlife Watching

If you have ever witnessed endangered Green Turtle babies hatch and try to make their way to the water, you will know what a special experience it is. Oman remains dedicated to enabling these kind of wildlife encounters while protecting the animals.

Mountain Biking and Cycling

Cycling and mountain biking has risen in popularity in the Sultanate, with both amateur and professional cyclists appreciating the country for its stunning diverse landscapes and the new challenge that riding in Oman presents.

Paragliding

Paragliding is a newer addition to Oman’s rapidly growing adventure tourism scene, adding to an already impressive suite of outdoor pursuits in the country. Several tour companies offer beginner, intermediate, and pilot courses for anyone interested.